Researcher Says Sask. Survey On Recreational Pot ‘Invalid’ Because It Can Be Taken Outside The Province

Article by Morgan Modjeski, Saskatoon Starphoenix

Researcher says Sask. survey on recreational pot 'invalid' because it can be taken outside the province  Some critics are calling the Saskatchewan government's survey on recreational pot "misleading" and "invalid" after they discovered it contains information that is contradictory to messages issued by the federal government.   Morgan Modjeski, Saskatoon StarPhoenix MORGAN MODJESKI, SASKATOON STARPHOENIX. Jessica Playford, an employee at Skunk Funk Smoker's Emporium in Saskatoon, has concerns about inconsistencies between information in the Government of Saskatchewan's survey on recreational pot and what the federal government has said. September 20, 2017

Some critics are calling the Saskatchewan government’s survey on recreational pot “misleading” and “invalid” after they discovered it contains information that is contradictory to messages issued by the federal government.

The survey, which has received more than 30,000 complete and incomplete responses, indicates that the consumption of Cannabis referred to in survey questions “does not include edibles (food products that contain cannabis) as they will not be legalized under federal law.”

However, information on the Government of Canada website indicates products like edibles “would be made available for purchase once appropriate rules for their production and sale are developed.”

In response to an interview request about the inconsistency, the provincial Ministry of Justice provided a prepared statement.

“Our understanding is that edibles are not being legalized by the Federal Government at this time as rules for their production and sale have not been developed. If rules are introduced to permit these products, the province will consider how best to accommodate them,” it stated.

Marc Spooner, a University of Regina professor who ran for the NDP in the 2011 federal election, said the misrepresentation of the federal government’s plan is only one issue with the survey. He said the fact that it’s not limited to Saskatchewan Internet Protocol (IP) addresses means people from across Canada — and potentially other countries — can take the survey.

“It’s very vulnerable to being hacked,” Spooner said. “There’s actually a term for that; it’s called ‘freeping,’ and that’s when a group from a certain viewpoint purposely distorts an online poll or survey.”

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