Regulators Urged to Include So-Called Grey Market in Marijuana Legalization

Article by Laura Kane, Financial Post

Marijuana Grey Market. Regulators urged to include so-called grey market in marijuana legalization. Marijuana products are pictured at Eden Medicinal Society in Vancouver, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2018.JONATHAN HAYWARD / THE CANADIAN PRESS

If it wasn’t for the scent, customers who wandered into Eden Medicinal Society would be forgiven for thinking they had entered a boutique health store rather than a marijuana dispensary.

The distinctive fragrance greets shoppers at the door. It wafts from jars filled with bright green British Columbia bud lining spotless glass shelves. Flat-screen monitors on gleaming white walls display prices of golden hemp flower paste and mocha THC syrup.

Behind the counter stands Vanessa Dandurand, the 30-year-old store manager with an encyclopedic knowledge of cannabis and many dedicated return customers.

“For so many of our clients, this can be the only positive interaction they have all day. Their other stops today might be the pharmacy to pick up their prescription. It might be their doctor who tells them their cancer isn’t getting any better,” she said.

The dispensary operates in the so-called grey market, or the portion of the marijuana industry that has both illegal and legal elements. Federal law bans selling weed over the counter, but Vancouver and Victoria have granted business licences to more than two dozen pot shops, including this Eden location.

With legalization looming this summer, the fate of the licensed weed stores remains hazy. While the province has said it will allow both private and public shops, it has not released its full slate of regulations nor made clear how existing dispensaries will be incorporated.

There are a dizzying number of questions for the province to consider, said Kerry Jang, a Vancouver councillor and co-chair of a provincial-municipal committee providing input on B.C.’s marijuana regulations.

“If you were to roll in the current existing cannabis shops, right now they’re selling a lot of illegal product. We know under the federal rules they have to sell only product that’s grown by a licensed producer, so what happens to the old product?” he asked.

“Is it destroyed? Are they allowed to sell it until the stocks are gone, or is it turned over, or do they have to get rid of it before they get a provincial licence?”

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