Indigenous-Owned and Operated Cannabis Platform Launches on National Indigenous Peoples Day

Article by Sam Riches, Growth Op

Breadcrumb Trail Links News Legalization Indigenous-owned and operated cannabis platform launches on National Indigenous Peoples Day Red Market Brand’s long-term goal is to “establish a national network of First Nation-licenced producers who will supply Red Market and other First Nation cannabis products — all approved by Health Canada.” Author of the article: Sam Riches Publishing date: Jun 21, 2021 • 49 minutes ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation Red Market Brand will share "the potential success of our business model with other First Nations organizations across Canada," says Christian Sinclair, Onekanew (Chief) for the Opaskwayak Cree Nation. / Red Market Brand will share "the potential success of our business model with other First Nations organizations across Canada," says Christian Sinclair, Onekanew (Chief) for the Opaskwayak Cree Nation. / Photo by Red Market Brand

Red Market Brand (RMB) will give Canadian consumers an Indigenous option when it comes to purchasing Health Canada-approved cannabis products.

Founded by Isadore Day, former Regional Chief of Ontario, and Christian Sinclair, Onekanew (Chief) for the Opaskwayak Cree Nation, the long-term goal of the platform is “to establish a national network of First Nation-licenced producers who will supply Red Market and other First Nation cannabis products — all approved by Health Canada.”

“The Red Market Brand is for full supply chain inclusion,” Day tells The GrowthOp, adding that RMB is meant to help correct what is seen as the government’s failure to meaningfully consult with Indigenous communities on the Cannabis Act.

A portion of RMB’s profits will be devoted “to creating sustainable First Nation community health and wealth,” Day says.

“It’s really important that we not miss any economic opportunity and I think governments now recognize that there’s a huge tie between that of reconciliation and the history of First Nations people in this country being somewhat in substandard conditions because of the former residential school education policies that really set us back,” he argues.

“This is us now saying, what sort of accommodation and what sort of mutual interests exists between a nation-to-nation partnership approach between a First Nation government and that of the Crown? Here’s the opportunity for us to say, ‘How can we do this to bridge that gap?’ And to say that we finally got something right in terms of economic reconciliation,” Day says.

Day suggests a platform like RMB can also help speed up a legislative timeline that may still be years away from being substantially updated and bring economic benefit to communities in the meantime.

Read the full article here.

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