Edibles, Vapes and Oils: What You Need to Know About Cannabis 2.0

Article by Guelph Today

Edibles, vapes and oils: What you need to know about cannabis 2.0 TORONTO — Weed-infused brownies, CBD-based hand creams and cannabis vaping products are now legal in Canada, but eager consumers will have to wait until at least mid-December — and the province with the most licensed pot shops is signalling that earl

Weed-infused brownies, CBD-based hand creams and cannabis vaping products are now legal in Canada, but eager consumers will have to wait until at least mid-December — and the province with the most licensed pot shops is signalling that early 2020 is more realistic.

Regulations governing next-generation cannabis products such as edibles, beverages, vapes and topical forms of cannabis came into effect as of Oct. 17 — exactly one year after Canada legalized recreational pot.

Due to the mandatory 60-day notice period companies must provide to Health Canada before selling these products, the earliest these so-called Cannabis 2.0 goods can legally go on sale in Canada is mid-December.

Companies have already begun unveiling details of their products ahead of time — ranging from spring water to mints that contain CBD and THC, respectively, two active ingredients found in cannabis.

These cannabis-derivative products will be subject to strict regulations, including a cap on the level of active ingredients and packaging. They also cannot contain nicotine, caffeine or alcohol, and companies will not be able to call these beverages beer or wine.

For edible cannabis, whether food or beverage, the amount of THC will be capped at 10 milligrams per container, according to Health Canada regulations. For example, in a package of grape-flavoured gummies, the total amount of THC in all the pieces must amount to no more than 10 milligrams.

Weed extracts are limited to 1,000 milligrams of THC per container. A bottle could contain 100 THC capsules of an extract that each contain 10 milligrams of THC, for instance.

Topicals, such as lotions, must have no more than 1,000 milligrams of THC in a container.

These goods must not be reasonably considered to be appealing to kids, which would take into account factors such as shape, flavour and scent, and must be contained in plain, child-proof packaging.

Health Canada has said to expect a “limited selection” in legal stores in mid-December, at the earliest.

Albertans will likely see these products available for sale in stores and online by early next year, according to the provincial body responsible for regulating cannabis.

“While nothing is definite and time will tell, that January 2020 timeline reflects when consumers can expect to see products on shelves,” said Heather Holmen, communications manager for Alberta Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis Commission, in an emailed statement.

Read the full article here.

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