Are the CBD and THC Levels Listed on Cannabis Packaging Actually Accurate?

Article by Sam Riches, Growth Op

BUSINESS Are the CBD and THC levels listed on cannabis packaging actually accurate? Safety and quality assurance were supposed to be two of the hallmarks of legalization. But in the world of highly-regulated, legal cannabis, can consumers trust what the labels say? By Sam Riches Warning labels on cannabis products sold at the Société québécoise du cannabis outlet on St-Hubert St. in Montreal. John Mahoney / Montreal Gazette

In December, New Brunswick-based producer Zenabis recalled a line of “CBD Light” gel caps, labelled as containing six milligrams of CBD per capsule, with no THC. It turns out, they were actually THC gel caps with no CBD whatsoever.

Zenabis isn’t the only producer to run into labelling issues. Last September, Aurora Cannabis recalled it’s Blue Dream Sativa which had been sold through the Société québécoise du cannabis (SQDC). The label said the flower contained 19.1 per cent total THC, but the correct value was 15.7 per cent. More than 3,000 units were sold before the product was recalled.

More recently, in April, consumers who picked up a package of MedReleaf Corp.’s San Rafael ’71 Island Sweet Skunk were in for a surprise. A batch of the strain that was labelled as having a total THC content of 17.99 mg/g actually clocked in at 179.88 mg/g.

These cases are not as uncommon as you might believe. Safety and quality assurance were supposed to be two of the hallmarks of legalization. But in the world of highly-regulated, legal cannabis, can consumers trust what the labels say?

Read the full article here.

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