High and Dry: How Legalisation of Cannabis is Impacting Local Water Security

Article by The Source Magazine

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On the desert edge of Las Vegas, Nevada, an organic farmer harnesses ample sun and soil–and water siphoned from the distant Colorado River–to offer his customers yearround access to local produce. They may come for fresh asparagus, eggplant or sweet peppers. But what they come running back for, he concedes, is his locally grown aromatic flowering herb: Cannabis sativa, otherwise known as marijuana.

His cash crop is facing competition, across the western US and abroad. The cultural fears and political bans that once forced cannabis growers quite literally into the closet are giving way to acceptance. Increasingly, marijuana is becoming just another taxable substance, like tobacco or beer.

Officials who haven’t legalised both its consumption and production often simply look the other way. Based on price signals from Europe and North Africa to the Americas and Oceania, import substitution in the cannabis market has been noticed in almost every developed country. Ted Leggett, an analyst at UN Office of Drugs and Crime, warns: “Cannabis is the dominant illicit drug in every region of the world, and its use is growing almost everywhere.”

On the desert edge of Las Vegas, Nevada, an organic farmer harnesses ample sun and soil–and water siphoned from the distant Colorado River–to offer his customers yearround access to local produce. They may come for fresh asparagus, eggplant or sweet peppers. But what they come running back for, he concedes, is his locally grown aromatic flowering herb: Cannabis sativa, otherwise known as marijuana.

His cash crop is facing competition, across the western US and abroad. The cultural fears and political bans that once forced cannabis growers quite literally into the closet are giving way to acceptance. Increasingly, marijuana is becoming just another taxable substance, like tobacco or beer.

Officials who haven’t legalised both its consumption and production often simply look the other way. Based on price signals from Europe and North Africa to the Americas and Oceania, import substitution in the cannabis market has been noticed in almost every developed country. Ted Leggett, an analyst at UN Office of Drugs and Crime, warns: “Cannabis is the dominant illicit drug in every region of the world, and its use is growing almost everywhere.”

Read full article here.

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