Merger Madness: Canada’s Marijuana Industry Enters Consolidation Phase

Article by Peter Armstrong, CBC News

ANALYSIS Merger madness: Canada's marijuana industry enters consolidation phase Legalization isn't even here yet and there are signs that the Wild West days of Canadian cannabis are over By Peter Armstrong, CBC News . Experts say the industry will consolidate to a few big growers and a bunch of "craft" producers making smaller amounts. (Seth Perlman/Associated Press)

Canada’s cannabis industry is shedding its wild adolescence and maturing into adulthood as it prepares for the legalization of recreational marijuana this summer. Companies are bulking up, knowing the promise of billions of dollars will draw bigger players and more competition.

That path to adulthood though is expensive and fraught with risk. So, it’s perhaps inevitable that Canada’s cannabis players are looking to mergers to scale up and stave off competition.

Consultancy Ernst & Young surveyed nearly a dozen licensed producers about the state of the industry and where things are headed.

“Many believe that consolidation is inevitable, leaving a few large players post-legalization,” Ernst & Young said in a report this week.

Bulk up and diversify

Evidence of that strategy is everywhere right now. A marijuana company from Alberta called Aurora Cannabis has launched a hostile takeover bid for Saskatchewan-based CanniMed Therapeutics.

CanniMed would rather hunt than be hunted. So it launched its own bid and announced a plan to buy an Ontario-based company called Newstrike Resources. They say that merger would result in single entity worth more than half a billion dollars. (You may have heard of Newstrike. It’s the company that partnered with the Tragically Hip earlier this year — one more sign that everyone’s trying to get a piece of the market.)

Aurora is pushing ahead with the hostile bid. But it’s also looking at ways of making these deals less costly and less painful. It issued a statement last week indicating it has ways of nudging unwilling participants into making a deal. That’s because Aurora just bought a greenhouse design firm and the company says it will use that firm as a way of pressuring rival producers into those “partnerships.”

An offer you can’t refuse

Chuck Rifici is one of Canada’s leading investors in the cannabis space. (He helped found Tweed and is the company’s former CEO. He was until recently on the board of Aurora.) He says these deals make sense at this stage because pot companies can use their sky-high stock values to throw weight around and buy up smaller players in all-stock deals.

“It makes sense to do deals where you’re buying optionality in a future market for not much in stock,” he told CBC News. “These smaller companies are in a position to fill in gaps and get a nice premium on their stock and the larger guys are essentially printing cheap paper to do those deals.

“It’s win-win.”

Read full article here.

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