9 Prescription Medications You Should Avoid Mixing With Weed

Article by Anna Wilcox, Herb

9 Prescription Medications You Should Avoid Mixing With Weed. Medical cannabis is becoming increasingly more popular around the world. But, while the herb is proving to be a useful medical tool, researchers still know fairly little about how cannabis may interact with various pharmaceutical medications. In the upcoming years, this will certainly be a major area of study. In the meantime, here are nine prescription medications that you generally avoid mixing with weed (or at least talk to a professional about).

Medical cannabis is becoming increasingly more popular around the world. But, while the herb is proving to be a useful medical tool, researchers still know fairly little about how cannabis may interact with various pharmaceutical medications. In the upcoming years, this will certainly be a major area of study. In the meantime, here are nine prescription medications that you generally avoid mixing with weed (or at least talk to a professional about).

The best advice? If you’re trying a new medication and decide to consume cannabis, listen to your body and talk to a doctor. 

Drug interactions are quite complicated. Not only might two substances interact with each other, but they may also interact with whatever anomalies you may have going on with your personal biochemistry.

For example, while one person may feel overly sedated after mixing cannabis with Ativan, another person may find that cannabis helps them lower their dose of the benzodiazepine or deal with difficult to manage side effects.

If you’ve been consuming cannabis regularly, suddenly stopping once you start a new medication may result in some withdrawal symptoms.  This could affect how you respond to a new medication.

To avoid a bad time, it may be best to talk to a medical professional about gradually increasing your dose of a new medication and staying small with cannabis to see how the new drug cocktail makes you feel.

The more drugs you add in, the more challenging things become. It’s important to note that the information presented in this article is far from complete and intended for educational purposes only. Always work with a medical professional when testing out new drug interactions.

Having a terrible reaction? Call for emergency assistance.

1. Drugs containing propoxyphene

Back in 2010, the opioid painkiller propoxyphene was withdrawn from the U.S. market. The compound is known to be toxic to the heart, even in doses formerly considered therapeutic.

However, if you happen to have any leftover propoxyphene medications, it is best to not use them. It’s also unwise to mix them with cannabis.

Drugs that contain propoxyphene include:

  • Balacet
  • Darvon (Compound 32, Compound 65, N)
  • Darvoset (N 100, A500, N 50)
  • PC-Cap
  • PP-Cap
  • Propacet 100
  • Propoxyphene Compound 65
  • Trycet
  • Wygesic

Symptoms to watch for:

  • Oversedation
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Impaired judgement
  • Impaired motor skills
  • Impaired thinking

These symptoms may be worse in the elderly.

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